Fireworks ban affects more than the forests

With the holiday weekend, right around the corner and the explosive fire conditions clouding the skies with an ominous haze and clouding the future of the existence of fireworks in the state. With statelaw makers proposing the ban of fireworks in emergency conditions (i.e. now), and grocery stores pulling there store displays of fireworks out of the... people are still worried that there still needs an ultimate ban within the state's borders.

Now flashback to three of my New Mexican summers. A semi-truck trailer deposits 40,000+ dollars worth of fireworks in a parking lot to be protected by a gaudy piece of white vinal. Bunting, display cases, are all arranged within the earshot of the hungry cash register.  I was among hundreds that would personally live in Fireworks Stands/ for the greater half of June and all the way past. These individuals would be either like me being a college student looking for a quick cash, little league baseball teams looking for a fundraiser to help their children, churches to help the congregation, people sought after the fireworks as ancient agriculturalist looked forward to the rainy season.

Temperatures would constantly linger over the hundreds and working on a parking lot surface did not provide any relief. If the temperatures didn't kill me, the monotonous pipe dream that passers-by would want a box of poppers would do it. Or, of course the wind collapsing a one-ton tent in my sleep, or the large concentration of tarantulas. The whole experience would last about 3 weeks, where limited bathing and lack of amenities, would easily transform any cosmopolitan dandy into a haggard gypsy. Granted the latter of the people that would be spending what would almost be something equivalent to my life savings on things that go boom. There were always those parents that are sharing their first fourth of July with children. There were always those that have family There were young married couples from Arizona that recently moved to Albuquerque that were amazed of the pastel colored boxes and cylinders that fireworks titled "Light Up the Night" or "Purple People Eater," and that this is the first time in their history that they get to light fireworks (and I would have to show them how to light it too). As much as I felt like I was simply selling something that sits in a box and goes boom, bang, or pop--I also felt like I was selling a part of the summer experience as much as sitting on a patio drinking a beverage (that could or could not be of alcoholic in nature) after a day of battling the heat of over 105 degrees. 

All of the vendors normally work under pure profit i.e. the more that you sell the more you earn. After working for the aforementioned 3 weeks and  normally a total of 36 hours on the 3rd and 4th of July, the payoff was generally in commensurate of the time ( and probably health) sacrificed.  I was able to see the world, by people blowing up a small part of it. By having a ban or boycott of fireworks would cause many to lose in their investment entirely.

Granted the root of the issue doesn't lay in selling or not selling of fireworks, more of the responsiblity of those that use it. And whether or not many of the fireworks can be pulled out of the city those that already have them or want more, always go at any means necessary to get that what goes boom in the night. 

Whether or not the policymakers decide that the future of fireworks. Don't make the casual fireworks seller hold of the ashes of New Mexico's forests. Give it to the one the lights the match.

 

Views: 6

Tags: ban, fire, fireworks, fourth, july, of

Comment by Lahjik on July 2, 2011 at 12:45pm
I understand that people often are trying to make a living by selling fireworks, or whatever the current "BAN IT!!!" item might be.  However, the simple fact is that it's irresponsible to sell fireworks in an environment such as we're seeing in NM, Ariz, Texas and most of the West right now.  If they ordered $40k worth of fireworks last month then they should have known better; if they placed that order a year ago well it's just the luck of the draw.  All of us must adjust our behaviors to prevent disaster.  Whether it's someone so stuck in their ways as to require something blowing up to understand the importance of independence or just some moron throwing a cigarette out the window of her car the time has come for a change of behavior.  One of the small towns near me (Schertz, Tx) has cancelled its fireworks show and it instead putting on a laser show using a screen strung between trees in a city park.  Maybe not exactly as dynamic but I have to appreciate that they're at least trying to make a change and have some fun rather than slogging forward with the exact same mentality that has caused so many problems.
Comment by Another Mike on July 2, 2011 at 8:40pm

Like all business ventures, list it as a bad investmen-- like lahjik mentioned already.

 

I heard a kid (vender salesperson) saying something about how people just should use common sense.

That was funny --  Real funny.

Comment by ramon t on July 2, 2011 at 10:10pm
Common sense is funny?
Comment by Another Mike on July 3, 2011 at 9:52am

It somewhat relates to my thoughts on how all people need is to be BETTER educated or MORE INFORMED from the other thread regarding banning fire works.  Example:  Do we not get enough media saturation regarding drinking and driving, texting while driving, safe sex, FAS, ditches are deadly, and etc?  Clearly education isn't enough.

 

The fact that MOST people should just be expected to use common sense, and not set forests ablaze with fireworks -- that's what is funny to me.

 Besides, even those with an overabundance of common sense are still prone to accidents.

Comment by Ben Moffett on July 6, 2011 at 12:24pm
This has been a destructive fire season, perhaps because government agencies are leery of doing controlled burns much anymore, perhaps not surprisingly because the set fire at Bandelier a decade ago got out of control. Fire needs to sweep through forested areas and grasslands periodically to keep major fires from occurring. Yellowstone burned in 1988 because of local opposition to allowing natural (lightening) fires to burn ("it'll kill tourism...the park will look awful...) but that park is more beautiful than ever today, thanks to the fire that cleared old timber, added new species (owls who nest in dead trees), re-established plant life, etc.)

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